sheamackenzie said: I MISS YOOOOOOOU! I’m so disappointed I couldn’t go this weekend. :( ::hugs::

OMG, I miss you too!! I was a little heart-broken when I heard you wouldn’t be able to make it.  But I’ll be in your area before heading to DragonCon, so if you’re free I WILL FIND YOU!

errandofmercy said: oh my gosh you’re so lovely! I’m so happy I finally get to see what you look like instead of your steering wheel :p

*blush* Thank you! Now I’m thinking I’ll have to post all the really bad pics, so you can get the true me. ^_^;; You know, I never really thought about the fact that people who don’t know me will associate me with my steering wheel and cheetah.  I really should update it so it’s my current car with Mr. Cheetah…. :P

Chapter three is here! And here’s a taste of the ongoings in Minas Tirith High School Saturday detention this week: 

“Wherever thou goest, my thought goes with thee” ~ Éomer refrains from making a horn o’ Gondor joke ~ she’s just not that into you ~ U mad, bro? ~ Clothes Don’t Shrink at the Entwash! ~ renewed shall be the blade that was broken ~ that apology was probably Merry’s idea, you know

pseudonymitea

allthingslinguistic:

baldymonster:

allthingslinguistic:

Arika Okrent explains schwas on Lexicon Valley

We all know that English spelling is rarely a good guide to pronunciation. One big reason for this is the prevalence of schwa in the spoken language. That’s why dictionaries and other written guides to pronunciation make use of a special symbol to represent the schwa sound. It looks like this: ǝ—an upside down e. But what is schwa anyway? Here are nine things to help you get to know this very important vowel.

1. ANY WRITTEN VOWEL CAN BE A SPOKEN SCHWA

A schwa is the ‘uh’ sound found in an unstressed syllable. For example, the first syllable in amazing (ǝ-MA-zing), the first syllable in tenacious (tǝ-NA-cious), the second syllable in replicate (RE-plǝ-cate), the second syllable in percolate (PER-cǝ-late), the first syllable in supply (sǝ –PLY), the first syllable in syringe (sǝ-RINGE). That’s a written A, E, I, O, U and even a Y coming out as schwa in the spoken version.

Schwas are very common in English (although they’re surprisingly difficult to play in IPA Scrabble, because they’re far more common in polysyllabic words). They’re less common in other languages, and are one of the things that contribute to non-native accents in both directions: English speakers tend to reduce vowels to schwa even when it’s unwarranted, and speakers of many other languages tend to pronounce too many full vowels. 

Because of how common and distinctively-shaped schwa is, it (along with wugs) have become a ubiquitous icon for linguistics. For example, there’s a schwa necklace, dozens of schwa mugs and t-shirts, and of course the publication Schwa Fire

Btw, if you’re saying these aloud and can’t convince yourself that they’re all the same sound or that some of them are clearly more like an “ih” sound like in sit or thin than an “uh”, you’re not crazy. There are actually two reduction vowels in English, schwa and what’s called barred i, or ɨ. They are often treated as the same and called schwa for simplicity, but in my dialect at least, barred i is actually way more frequent.

The classic example used to demonstrate the difference is to say the phrase “Rosa’s roses” out loud. The second vowel in “Rosa’s” is a schwa, whereas in “roses” it’s a barred i. Barred i often shows up in prefixes, suffixes, and in reduced vowels that occur between alveolar consonants, such as d, t, n, or s.

Yes, good point! 

The only words in those samples I pronounce with a schwa are “amazing” and “supply”. (And I’m including the “ih” schwa.)

The life of an over-enunciator. ;)

errandofmercy

errandofmercy:

lisafer:

thudworm:

thudworm:

Here’s the link for the movie night, on Sunday afternoon. (Or Monday morning for some of us.)

Everyone is welcome to join us, and feel free to spread the word to others who might be interested, The more the merrier!

errandofmercy bofurs-wife mckittericks ichijoukenichiro notanightlight (anyone else from the chat whose tumblrs i don’t know)

Happening soon guys. Come join us in the chat to talk while we watch. Link and the channel to join is #gigolas

Ahh, drat - wish I’d gotten home from my trip sooner. ;)

that’s okay, because I am definitely buying a copy of this. We can livestream it later or watch it at Dragon Con XD

I approve of this plan. If the con/crowd/breathing gets too overwhelming, we run away and watch this. :D

purpleterpsichore

ineffable-hufflepuff:

slytherinfeminist:

why be a fan of severus snape when you can be a fan of regulus black?

Regulus Black who was noble and zealous and believed with all his heart in a cause. Regulus Black who saw his brother slip away from him, the brother who escaped their…

Shocking news - you can be a fan of BOTH for different reasons.

awhileanyway

secretbraintwin:

barricadeponine:

just remember that had voldemort picked neville to kill instead of harry and nevile was the boy who lived/the chosen one if neville had that lightening bolt scar severus snape would still be a death eater

it’s not like he thought being a death eater was wrong — it wasn’t until something directly affected him did he reconsider and idk about you but that is not my definition of “bravery” in the slightest

That…is actually a really good point

Wait…. I don’t care what initiates the change in a person- anyone who takes a moment to re-evaluate their life and come to the conclusion that they held some seriously screwed up beliefs, and then go to lengths to rectify their actions deserves at least a teeny bit of respect.

Snape probably would have not changed his mind without the influence of Dumbledore, brought on by his massively creepy feelings about Lily. I agree with that whole-heartedly. And if he had, he would likely have ended up with a story less impressive than Regulus Black’s. But he didn’t. He spied, he lied, he did plenty of dangerous things that WERE courageous, and with time he changed his mind.

And in my view of the world, changing your mind can take an awful lot of courage. And being courageous doesn’t make you a good person.

Snape is a multi-faceted character, and I think sometimes we paint him completely one way or another.

maggie-stiefvater

fullmetaloptimist asked:

OK I'll take the bait -- how fucked up is Kavinsky REALLY? I'm expecting at least an 5 on the Richter scale of heartbreak.

maggie-stiefvater answered:

Okay, I’ll take the bait back, because I’m young and crotchety.

Note, spoilers for Dream Thieves will abound.

SPOILERS

SPOILERS

SPOILERS

SPOILING THINGS

Readers can interpret the events of the book in all sorts of ways, obviously, but here are things that happen canonically in The Dream Thieves:

  • Kavinsky drugs his mother without her knowledge
  • Kavinsky pursues Ronan with multiple text messages and gifts that indicate he has observed Ronan closely — i.e., copies of bracelets Ronan always wears and Ronan’s driver’s license
  • Kavinsky generally calls Ronan either gay or a girl
  • Kavinsky is seen once with a girl, who he calls “bitch”
  • Kavinsky has at least one dead companion who he dreamed a perfectly obedient replacement for — it is heavily implied that Kavinsky was somehow responsible for the guy’s death.
  • Kavinsky claims to have killed his own father (but this is debatable, as Kavinsky clearly is a liar)
  • Kavinsky tries to get Ronan to give up his friends
  • Kavinsky touches Ronan’s head, taps Ronan’s teeth with a pen, leaves stuff at Ronan’s home when he knows he won’t be there
  • Kavinsky gives Ronan a drug that renders Ronan immobile and barely conscious and then, while Ronan is helpless — and only then — sensually touches Ronan’s body (Ronan tells himself this might be a dream)
  • Ronan tells Kavinsky that they will never be an item, but Kavinsky keeps texting him
  • Kavinsky tells Ronan that consent is overrated (which echoes him continuously stepping into Ronan’s space without permission)
  • Kavinsky ultimately grows frustrated that Ronan will not give in, kidnaps Ronan’s brother, drugs him, and stuffs him in the trunk of a car to provoke a reaction from Ronan.

Here are other things that are canonical:

  • Kavinsky is a scary, terrible predator
  • Kavinsky has a very logical backstory that leads him to this place
  • Kavinsky chooses to be led to this place

Here are other, other things, also canonical:

  • Kavinsky can pull things from his dreams, has an absent (possibly dead) father, and an absent (largely useless) mother
  • Ronan can pull things from his dreams, has an absent (definitely dead) father, and an absent (largely useless) mother

I very much enjoyed writing Kavinsky — as a character, he challenged and delighted me. And I really wanted him to challenge and delight readers. One of the main ideas I’m exploring as I write the Raven Cycle is the question: how much are you a product of your upbringing? And can you overcome the terrible parts of it to become something better? All of the characters engage with these questions, which I find fiendishly interesting in real life. Kavinsky and Ronan both get the same set of circumstances and handle them in very different ways. It’s a choice.

So do I like Kavinsky? Out of all the characters I have ever written, he is one of my favorites.* Top four, probably. Or five, since four is an ugly number. But he’s a terrible person, more terrible because he chose it every. step. of. the. way. A logical backstory is not justification for trampling over consent, for kidnapping, for harassment.

Otherwise Adam would be justified in hitting Blue when he was angry, because he was hit by his father.

Kavinsky’s scale on the Richter scale of heartbreak? I’ll give him a solid 9, where 10 = absolutely zero evidence of desire to change.

These are all of my thoughts on Kavinsky. Your mileage may vary.

*ETA: I mean, people: I painted my car like his.

awhileanyway

"The question of the Ring is something that has been nagging Boromir since the journey began. Because he’s a human in a land of men, he is more susceptible to its power and more likely to be tempted. This is a thing, that throughout the journey he is always trying to keep down. And keep back this temptation, this sort of need, to hold the ring. To just have it in his presence. At the end , when he sees Frodo, in one of his weak moments, it finally overcomes him. It’s like a drug, eating away, he’s overcome with it at that point. Then he’s totally sorry, he’s devastated by that and in a way, he feels he can’t go on anymore. He feels he can’t be whole again. He’s let everybody down. So he’s made a journey and he’s a better person for it. Because he’s come to see that there is actually more to his existence in Middle-earth then he originally imagined.
 He originally imagined it military and fighting. Gondor keeping the enemy at bay. He wants to just use the Ring to fight the enemy. This is foolishness, let’s use it. He becomes more world-wise and open. He says to Aragorn at one point, ‘I didn’t realize what I know now.’ But by then, it was too late.”
— Sean Bean

"The question of the Ring is something that has been nagging Boromir since the journey began. Because he’s a human in a land of men, he is more susceptible to its power and more likely to be tempted. This is a thing, that throughout the journey he is always trying to keep down. And keep back this temptation, this sort of need, to hold the ring. To just have it in his presence. At the end , when he sees Frodo, in one of his weak moments, it finally overcomes him. It’s like a drug, eating away, he’s overcome with it at that point. Then he’s totally sorry, he’s devastated by that and in a way, he feels he can’t go on anymore. He feels he can’t be whole again. He’s let everybody down. So he’s made a journey and he’s a better person for it. Because he’s come to see that there is actually more to his existence in Middle-earth then he originally imagined.

He originally imagined it military and fighting. Gondor keeping the enemy at bay. He wants to just use the Ring to fight the enemy. This is foolishness, let’s use it. He becomes more world-wise and open. He says to Aragorn at one point, ‘I didn’t realize what I know now.’ But by then, it was too late.”

Sean Bean